This article has been written in response to a comment from a new supporter who has chosen to discover the simple and easy way to paint and draw to become an artist (see links below)

(Thank you Jan for your confidence and persistence – I hope you find it helps).

So, if you have any doubts about lessons that seem complicated to you or seem determined to make you fail, take a look at the following and see if you can see good sense… 

Understandably, when you see sales promises for an art course that appear ambitious you have doubts that they can be true. So here are some words that will hopefully give you more confidence in looking for a simpler approach to learning.

For example… 

“A promise that you can paint within 1 hour is certainly true”

In fact it will take you longer to prepare the paper, brush, glass of water and watercolor paint than to actually paint. Yes, the painting itself might take longer to dry than an hour but your involvement with it should take a fraction of that time… 

“That is, unless you choose to make adjustments during the drying process – the kind of decision all artists choose to make”

As you progress through the simplest kind of painting and drawing course you will find that all of the trial paintings should take no more than a few minutes to do. Where you really learn how to paint is by carefully studying the transformations that occur during the drying time (which could take as long as a day).

If you learn nothing else, it is that the old lie, “It is as boring as watching paint dry”, does not apply to the work of an artist. The reason is precisely because this, particularly when using watercolors, is where the ‘magic’ of painting comes from.

“If you are prepared to watch the subtle changes as they happen you cannot fail to  learn about the art medium by quesioning what is happening as it happens right there before your eyes”

An artist surely knows his, or her, painting and drawing medium… 

  • It is from understanding how their chosen materials perform that enables them to gain control.
  • It is from the control an artist has that gives confidence to experiment with new techniques that extend their knowledge and skills.
  • It is from the gain in confidence of the artist that masterpieces of art can be created with surprising frequency.

It is from the minor and major masterpieces generated by an artist that promotes success, whether it be from sales of art or from the influence given to others who don’t yet realize that… 

“Learning to paint is easy”

It is the drying time of watercolors that gives them their strength. It is the reason why beginners should use them. The reason why so many fail to master them is because they never allow watercolor paints to show them how most of the hard work is done by the paints themselves. An over-keen novice painter who just doesn’t understand overworks what should be left alone.

So, in short, follow the simplest and easiest of painting and drawing lessons and try them out for yourself… 

“Try each of them 5 or 10 times and see that result are different each and every time”

Better still, keep in mind that you can paint the 5, 10, 20 simple versions, experimenting with minor or major variations in little or no more than an hour…

“Indeed, by doing several paintings at the same time this is where you learn fastest of all because you will not have time to interfere with natural drying processes”

Great art it may not be at the beginning. Yet, when you combine simple painting exercises along with equally simple and easy to do drawing exercises you are sure to arm yourself quickly with the basic skills to produce figurative or abstract art far beyond your expectations.

“Ultimately it is up to you! Disappointment and failure or simple, easy and unforced success! ”

I am confident that you can become the artist you want to be.

 

Wishing you every success with your Art

Michael Dale


Michael Dale is the author and publisher of ‘The Simple And Easy Way To Learn How To Paint Watercolors.

See examples of Simple Watercolor Paintings and claim your FREE video ‘Through The Eyes Of An Artist & you’ll receive the ’4 Golden Rules of Art for a Beginner’ delivered to your inbox.

 

Terms of republishing…

Each article listed on this website is an original work © Michael Dale. You are welcome to link to, or reprint these entire articles with no changes. You must agree to respect copyright by not changing titles or content. In particular, you must include the FULL Resource box and all links.

 

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It is this second part that I have found difficulty in writing. And, to a large extent, it has been responsible for the recent lack of article updates. Each time I have put pen to paper it has left me feeling nervous.

In part it is because I have very little experience in the art of the nude.

Also, although it is an area of art that many artist like to work there are things that beginners, amateurs and experienced artists might need to be aware of.

For many artists figure work can be hard to grasp. Although they may be proficient working with landscapes, architecture and machinery animal and human form can be beyond their skills. Personally, even though i have had some success with working horses and occasional farm animals I have found this a problem.

Indeed, I have only ever attempted one nude study. In truth I was quite happy with the result but it left the model, my ex-wife, somewhat less than impressed with the usual kind of comments like… 

“Does my bum really look as big as that!”

Apart from not finding the correct answer, as was the norm, it was not necessarily a huge criticism about my art. Yet, it was sufficient to make me question the likelihood of success as a painter of nudes. What was needed was more practice. And it is more practice that is still required.

Which leads to the question… 

“Where to learn how to draw and paint the nude?”

Fortunately there are plenty of courses that can teach you the basics of figure drawing in art classes online and at your local art club or art tutor. Unfortunately, if you find that life drawing classes are held when you are at work you are denied one of the vital elementswork – the naked model.

If you have some experience in art that involves the human body in its most natural form this leads to the next question…

“Where to locate male and female models prepared to pose for you”

So what do you do?

  • Ask your partner?
  • Ask a friend?

Or, do you choose to walk up to a perfect stranger and ask them to get undressed in front of you and let you stare at them for an hour or two while you struggle to draw a few lines that vaguely look human?

What response do you think you’ll get? A cheery “Yes please, it’s what I always wanted to do!”

Maybe this is what you find. But, equally probable is a somewhat less favorable response that could result in the threat of or physical act of damage to your vital organs. This is potentially uncomfortable to say the least. And, if you get a negative response you could find that you have more than a few less friends than you previous had.

And talking of losing friends and worse still…

Using the internet to search for artist references might appear to be a great idea. Sadly, although there is a huge amount of incredibly valuable information and resources to help with drawing and painting the human nude there is one pitfall you may want to avoid.

if you aren’t exceedingly careful, while researching you are likely to discover the world of on-line pornography…

You might think search terms that include ‘Nude’, ‘Naked’, ‘Bare’, ‘Undressed’ and ‘Unclothed’ on their own seem innocent enough it doesn’t take much imagination to figure out that without care other words are likely to get a far more graphic response of a less satisfactory nature.

The question is… “Do you want to draw and paint the human nude?” or “Do you want to become involved in the art of porn?”

“Is there any more to ask?”

Wishing you every success with your Art

Michael Dale


Michael Dale is the author and publisher of ‘The Simple And Easy Way To Learn How To Paint Watercolors.

See examples of Simple Watercolor Paintings and claim your FREE video ‘Through The Eyes Of An Artist & you’ll receive the ’4 Golden Rules of Art for a Beginner’ delivered to your inbox.

 

Terms of republishing…

Each article listed on this website is an original work © Michael Dale. You are welcome to link to, or reprint these entire articles with no changes. You must agree to respect copyright by not changing titles or content. In particular, you must include the FULL Resource box and all links.

 

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“Is the Internet a good and safe resource for an artist?” Part 1

December 4, 2013

This question has taken a long time to ask: – “How best to use the power of the Internet as an artist resource tool” It might seem reasonable to expect that the infinity of information for learning how to draw and paint should be a first call. And, under most circumstances this makes good sense. [...]

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“Is it time to start painting and drawing again?”

November 25, 2013

Hello! And welcome back I hope you will say if you have been wondering why there haven’t been regular posts for a while. If you have found it difficult to find time to learn how to paint and draw this is an article that could offer some encouragement to try again. “In a way this is [...]

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What do you do if you don’t feel like painting and drawing?

September 9, 2013

Here it is at long last – my next article. And, it isn’t specifically about learning to paint or learning how to draw. Indeed, it could include almost any other activity you normally love to do but sadly find for some unknown reason that the spark has gone. This is about how to continue as [...]

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Leisure Painter review – August 2013

August 12, 2013

Today, when you buy your copy of Leisure Painter magazine you will be welcomed by a bright watercolor painting that has been expertly produced by Tim Fisher who shows you how to use Caran d’Ache Museum Aquarelle soft watercolour pencils. But, for the first lesson you would be well advised to read Ingrid Lyon’s editorial on [...]

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Leisure Painter review – Summer 2013

July 2, 2013

Opening the pages of Leisure Painter magazine is always a pleasure… For some it will be the excitement of finding a treasure trove of tips and techniques that can improve their attempts at producing an artistic masterpiece. For others might be equally interested in seeing examples of other artists work – work that equally inspires [...]

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Leisure Painter review – July 2013

June 4, 2013

My apologies, I am overdue. It is that time already – time to write a few words reviewing the July issue of  Leisure Painter magazine. It is already late in the evening as I begin but I can easily agree with what the front cover, illustrated by Tony Paul’s painting of children on a beach, promises… “Summer [...]

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3 Vital Tips For An Art Beginner – Part 3

May 28, 2013

So, what does “Be guided but not led” mean to you as a talented artist? Well, in Part 1a there is the following statement to clarify… “It can make sense to take notice of suggestions but equally sensible to disregard recommendation unless they agree with you own ideas” Even though it goes some way towards [...]

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3 Vital Tips For An Art Beginner – Part 2

May 17, 2013

 Don’t compare your art with others… It is reasonable that an art beginner has an artist they admire. In reality the same also applies to experienced and professionals. No matter what stage of development you are at there will be another artist who seems to be able to produce paintings that appear to be beyond [...]

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